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Patient Education

Shoulder

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Introduction

The information provided in this website is aimed to provide a general overview of hip arthroscopy. By no means does this document offer a fully comprehensive review and any questions should be discussed with your surgeon. There are significant variations of shoulder arthroscopy techniques from surgeon to surgeon.

Overview

Arthroscopy is an orthopedic surgical procedure whereby the surgeon can evaluate and treat the shoulder joint. Arthroscopy is performed with the use of a camera and minimally invasive instruments. The first documented arthroscopy dates back to nearly a century ago during the 1910's when it was used as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the joint. Several years later, with advancements in the camera, optics, and techniques, arthroscopy become useful in the treatment of joint pathology such as meniscus tears in the knee joint. Currently, arthroscopy is a mainstay procedure for shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, ankle and foot disorders. The shoulder is an ideal joint for arthroscopy, especially in the treatment of rotator cuff tears, instability, labrum tears, SLAP lesions, and impingement.

Shoulder Arthroscopy Shoulder Arthroscopy

What are the Benefits of Arthroscopic Surgery

There are several benefits of arthroscopic surgery. The potential benefits over open shoulder surgery are: 1) less surgical injury - the arthroscope is inserted through small 1-2 cm incisions, or portals, that split the muscle fibers. When the camera is removed, the muscle fibers return to their normal position and alignment. This therefore minimizes contact with normal structures. This also results in 2) less surgical pain and potentially 3) faster recovery time. The cameras also provide 4) better visualization of the injured structures and therefore the surgeon is able to 5) perform a more anatomically correct repair. Another benefit of arthroscopy is that the procedure can be performed as an 6) outpatient procedure and the patients can often go home within a few hours after the procedure. All of these lead to improved overall outcomes and patient satisfaction.

Rotator Cuff

Rotator Cuff TearRotator Cuff Tear

What Can Be Treated With Arthroscopic Surgery in the Shoulder?

  • Rotator cuff tendon repair
  • Rotator cuff repair with augmentation or inter-positional graft for massive tears
  • SLAP lesion
  • Labrum repair
  • Shoulder instability
  • Cartilage repair.
  • Removal of loose bodies.
  • Addressing painful AC joint (weightlifters shoulder or AC arthritis).
  • Repairing AC joint separations.
  • Removing bursitis (bursectomy).
  • Releasing scar tissue in adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder).
  • Removing painful calcific tendon deposits.
  • Rotator cuff tendonitis.
  • Capsular releases in GIRD (Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit disorder).
  • Partial shoulder replacements (i.e. biological glenoid resurfacing)

What Can the Surgeon See with Shoulder Arthroscopy?

What are Common Causes of Shoulder Pain after the Age of 30, 40, 60?

The following are some common causes of a painful shoulder divided by age group:

Under 20: (no particular order)

  • Dislocations of shoulder joint
  • Separated acromioclavicular (AC) joint
  • Labrum tears
  • SLAP lesions
  • Growth plate injuries (in adolescents with open skeletal physis)
  • Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit (GIRD) Disorder
  • Clavicle fracture

Age 21-30:

  • Dislocations of shoulder joint
  • Separated acromioclavicular (AC) joints
  • AC joint arthritis or weight-lifters shoulder
  • Labrum tears
  • SLAP lesions
  • Partial tears of the rotator cuff
  • Biceps tendonitis
  • Calcific rotator cuff tendonitis
  • Early arthritis
  • Glenoid or humeral head fractures
  • Subacromial bursitis
  • Subcoracoid impingement
  • Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit (GIRD) Disorder
  • Clavicle fracture

Age 31-40:

  • Dislocations of shoulder joint
  • Separated acromioclavicular (AC) joints
  • AC joint arthritis or weight-lifters shoulder
  • Labrum tears
  • SLAP lesions
  • Biceps tendonitis, partial or complete tears
  • Calcific rotator cuff tendonitis
  • Early arthritis
  • Fractures
  • Partial rotator cuff tears
  • Small full thickness rotator cuff tears
  • Subacromial bursitis and impingement
  • Subcoracoid impingement
  • Clavicle fracture

Age 40-50:

  • Dislocations of shoulder joint
  • Acromioclavicular joint arthritis
  • Labrum tears
  • Partial or complete tears of the rotator cuff
  • Biceps tendonitis, partial tears, or complete tears
  • Calcific rotator cuff tendonitis
  • Early arthritis
  • Proximal humerus or clavicle fractures
  • Subacromial bursitis and impingement

Age 50-60:

  • Dislocations of shoulder joint
  • Acromioclavicular joint arthritis
  • Partial or full thickness tears of the rotator cuff
  • Biceps tendonitis, partial tears, or full thickness tears
  • Calcific rotator cuff tendonitis
  • Arthritis
  • Proximal humerus fractures
  • Subacromial bursitis and impingement

Age Over 60:

  • Dislocations of shoulder joint
  • Acromioclavicular joint arthritis
  • Partial or complete tears of the rotator cuff
  • Biceps tendonitis, partial tears, or full thickness tears
  • Calcific rotator cuff tendonitis
  • Rotator cuff tear induced arthritis
  • Osteoarthritis of shoulder joint
  • Proximal humerus fractures
  • Subacromial bursitis and impingement

Common Questions Regarding Rotator Cuff Tears and Surgery:

  Rotator Cuff Tear Brochure

What Are Some of the Causes?

  • Falls, sudden pulls, or other injuries.
  • Repetitive over-use of shoulder.
  • A bone spur or a tight space for the tendon.

What Age Group is Commonly Affected?

  • Most patients are over the age of 40.
  • Up to 30% can be younger.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Night-time pain.
  • Overhead activity pain.
  • Pain at front or side of shoulder.
  • Pain may radiate towards elbow or neck.
  • Clicking, crunching, popping.

How Are Tears Diagnosed?

  • By careful examination of the shoulder.
  • By other diagnostic tests, such as ultrasound or MRI scan.

How Are Tears Treated Without Surgery?

  • Physical therapy.
  • Activity modification.
  • Anti-inflammatories (Motrin, Aleve) or Tylenol.

What Happens If Tears Are Not Surgically Repaired?

  • In some cases, the pain improves with time.
  • Some tears may become larger with time.
  • Some small tears may heal.
  • Larger tears may lead to shoulder joint arthritis.

What Happens If I Wait to Repair My Tendon Tear?

  • Some people will eventually improve.
  • The tendon may retract and the muscle may atrophy
  • Tears may not be repairable if too much time has elapsed.

How Are Rotator Cuff Tears Treated Surgically?

  • Either open or using arthroscopic techniques.

What Is Arthroscopic Surgery?

  • A camera is inserted into the shoulder and the surgeon visualizes the shoulder through a video monitor.
  • A minimally-invasive surgical technique that avoids significant soft-tissue injury.

What are the Benefits of Arthroscopic Surgery?

  • A less invasive procedure with the benefits:
  • Less surgical dissection.
  • Less surgical pain.
  • Faster recovery rates
  • Better visualization of the shoulder anatomy.

What is the Success Rate of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair?

  • The success rate is anywhere from 60-100%.
  • Several important factors influence outcome such as: age, diabetes and other medical problems, smoking, size of the tear, how long ago the tear occurred, and patient compliance with the instructions after surgery.

What Holds the Tendon to the Bone?

  • The tendon can be repaired using suture anchors allowing the tendon to be sutured back to the bone.
  • Anchors can be absorbable or non-absorbable, like metal.

When and Why Should I Have Surgery?

  • If you continue to have pain despite therapy and medications.
  • If you wish to restore tendon function and relieve pain.
  • Earlier repairs have better outcomes than delayed repairs.

Is There An Age Restriction for Surgery?

  • Success is higher in patients under the age of 70, however, age itself is not the limiting factor.
  • A careful pre-operative assessment from your medical internist can determine if you are a candidate for surgery.

What Type of Anesthesia Will I Have?

  • Arthroscopies are performed under general anesthesia.
  • A nerve block may also be performed for pain relieve after surgery.

What Can I Expect the Night Before Surgery?

  • You may take your regularly scheduled medications.
  • Certain medications must be stopped before surgery (such as blood thinners). A complete list of these medications will be given to you by our office staff.
  • Do not eat or drink after midnight before your surgery.
  • You will be contacted by the hospital or surgical center the day before surgery.
  • You will be notified: when to arrive for your surgery,when you should not eat, and what medications you may continue to take. They will be helpful in answering questions you mayhave concerning medications, transportation, and other concerns.

Is My Surgery Outpatient and Same Day Surgery?

  • The majority of arthroscopic cases are outpatient procedures and patients are allowed to go home the same day of their procedure.
  • In certain cases, patients may stay overnight for observation at the hospital and will be allowed to go home in the morning after surgery.

What Happens If I Have an Anesthesia Nerve Block?

  • Patients who have a nerve block, will have prolonged anesthesia to the shoulder and arm and may go home with the arm still "numb".
  • Therefore, be careful to avoid any pressure or injury to the shoulder and arm as you will not feel the pain until the block has worn off.

Can I Drive Home After Surgery?

  • You should arrange transportation with family, friends, or other means for after surgery.
  • Do not drive home after having been administered anesthetics.
  • Driving is NOT permitted for 2-6 weeks after surgery depending on the type of procedure performed.

What Kind of Pain Can I Expect Following Surgery?

  • As with any surgery, there will be surgical pain. The benefit of minimally-invasive arthroscopic surgery is the limited amount of surgical dissection and faster recovery time.
  • You will be prescribed narcotic medication to go home with.
  • Do NOT make important decisions while taking narcotic medications.

What Should I Avoid After Surgery?

  • Do not attempt to lift the arm "actively" by yourself until directed.
  • Do NOT remove the sling. Remove the sling only for hygiene.
  • The tendon is repaired to bone with sutures and will take about 6 weeks to heal onto the bone and even longer for a firm repair. Early activity may cause failure of your repair.
  • Do NOT make important decisions immediately after surgery or while on narcotic medications.

When and How Do I Bathe or Shower After Surgery?

  • Do not bathe or submerge the shoulder in a pool until you have been cleared.
  • You may shower after 72 hours if the incisions are dry.

When Do I Remove the Dressings?

  • You may remove the shoulder dressings after 72 hours.
  • Please do NOT remove the white sticky "steri-strips".
  • Towel-dry the incision and place a band-aid over the steri-strips after showering.

What Pain Medications Do I Take After Surgery?

  • You will be prescribed a narcotic for pain relief after surgery.
  • You should continue the medications for at least 72 hours as directed and then wean the medications when you are able. This avoids unnecessary build-up of pain.

How do I Wean Pain Medications After Surgery?

  • Weaning narcotics is best done by alternating Tylenol in place of a regularly scheduled narcotic pill at every other scheduled narcotic dose.
  • Narcotics are eventually discontinued altogether.
  • Narcotics can make you constipated, nauseous, and can affect your ability to make decisions.

Do I Wear a Sling After Surgery?

  • The shoulder M U S T be maintained in a sling for 6 weeks (day and night time) except for showers, baths, and therapy.
  • Non-compliance with immobilization can cause failure of the repair.

What Shirt Should I Wear to Surgery?

  • Bring a loose fitting shirt (button-down or over-sized large T-shirt).
  • The arm is placed in the sling. The shirt is placed over the arm and sling.

Do I Receive Rehabilitation After Surgery?

  • Therapy begins according to a strict therapy schedule usually 2-4 weeks after surgery depending on the strength and size of repair.
  • Physical therapy continues over a 16-week period progressing from full immobilization to full active return to activities.
  • It will take approximately 4-6 months before returning to full overhead activities, golf and other activities.
  • Return to full activity depends on the size of the tear, activity requirements, and the repair strength.
  • Each patient has an individually designed rehab program.

Where Can I Do Therapy?

  • Therapy is performed with a licensed therapist usually at approved outpatient therapy centers.
  • Dr. Hommen will tailor a therapy protocol according to your shoulder needs that the therapist will follow.

When Can I Drive After Rotator Cuff Repair Surgery?

  • Usually sometime after 4-6 weeks after surgery.

Common Questions Regarding SLAP lesions and Labrum Tears and Surgery:

SLAP Lesion Brochure   SLAP Lesion Brochure

What Does SLAP stand for?

  • Superior Labrum Anterior Posterior lesion.

What is a SLAP lesion?

  • A detachment of the biceps anchor and superior labrum from its attachment on the superior glenoid.

What Causes a SLAP lesion?

  • A traction injury to the arm.
  • Throwing activity in overhead athletes.
  • Overhead repetitive injury to arm.

What Other Injuries May be Found With a SLAP Lesion?

  • Bicep tendon tear.
  • Labrum tear.
  • Capsule tear.
  • Rotator cuff tears.

How Are SLAP Lesions Treated Non-Surgically?

  • Shoulder therapy.
  • Avoiding painful activities.

How Are SLAP Lesions Surgically Treated?

  • Best treated arthroscopically.
  • Anchors are placed in the glenoid and used to repair the biceps and glenoid.

What Causes a Labrum Tear?

  • Throwing.
  • Shoulder dislocations or subluxations.

What is a Labrum Tear?

  • A tear of the cartilage that surrounds the glenoid of shoulder.
  • Can be described as acute, chronic, degenerative etc.

What Is Arthroscopic Surgery?

  • A less invasive procedure to repair the tendon tear.
  • A camera is inserted into the shoulder and viewed via a video monitor.
  • The surgeon can repair the lesion.

What are the Benefits of Arthroscopic Surgery?

  • A less invasive procedure with the benefits:
  • Less surgical dissection.
  • Less surgical pain.
  • Faster recovery rates.
  • Better visualization of the shoulder anatomy.

What Type of Anesthesia Will I Have?

  • Arthroscopies are performed under general anesthesia.
  • A nerve block may be performed for pain relief after surgery.

What Can I Expect the Night Before Surgery?

  • You may take your regularly scheduled medications.
  • Certain medications must be stopped before surgery (such as blood thinners). A complete list will be given to you by our office staff.
  • Do not eat or drink after midnight before your surgery.
  • You will be contacted by the hospital or surgical center the day before surgery.
  • You will be notified: when to arrive for your surgery, when you can eat, and will be helpful in answering questions you may have concerning medication, transportation, and other concerns.

When Do I Go Home After Surgery?

  • The majority of arthroscopic cases are outpatient procedures and patients are allowed to go home the same day of their procedure.
  • In certain cases, patients may stay overnight for observation at the hospital and will be allowed to go home in the morning after surgery.
  • After your surgery, expect to remain in the recovery room until you have been cleared to go home. This may require a few hours.

What Happens If I Have an Anesthesia Nerve Block?

  • Patients who have a nerve block, will have prolonged anesthesia to the shoulder and arm and may go home with the arm still "numb".
  • Therefore, be careful to avoid any pressure or injury to the shoulder and arm as you will not feel the pain until the block has worn off.

Can I Drive Home After Surgery?

  • You should arrange transportation with family, friends or other means for after surgery.
  • You will NOT be able to drive for 2-4 weeks after surgery.

What Kind of Pain Can I Expect Following Surgery?

  • As with any surgery, there will be surgical pain. The benefit of arthroscopic surgery is the limited amount of surgical dissection and faster recovery time.
  • You will be prescribed narcotic medication to go home with.
  • Do NOT make important decisions while taking narcotic medications.

What Pain Medications Do I Take After Surgery?

  • You will be prescribed a narcotic for pain relief after surgery.
  • You should continue the medication for the first 72 hours as directed and then wean the medications when you are able.

What Should I Avoid After Surgery?

  • Do not attempt to lift the arm "actively" by yourself.
  • Do NOT remove the sling. The repair will take about 4- 6 weeks to scar onto the bone and longer for complete healing. Early activity may cause failure of your repair.
  • Do NOT make important decisions immediately after surgery or while on narcotic medications.

When and How Do I Bathe or Shower After Surgery?

  • Do not bathe or go into a pool until Dr. Hommen has cleared you for such activity.
  • You may shower after 72 hours if the incisions are dry.
  • Remove dressings from shoulder prior to showering .
  • Remove sling and keep arm at side.

When Do I Remove the Dressings?

  • You may remove the shoulder dressings after 72 hours.
  • Please do NOT remove the white sticky "steri-strips".
  • Towel-dry the incision and place a band-aid over the steri-strips after showering.

How Do I Wean Pain Medications After Surgery?

  • Weaning narcotics is best done by alternating Tylenol in place of a regularly scheduled narcotic pill at every other scheduled narcotic dose.
  • Narcotics are eventually discontinued altogether.
  • Narcotics can make you constipated, nauseous, and can affect your ability to make decisions.

Do I Wear a Sling After Surgery?

  • The shoulder M U S T be maintained in a sling for 2-4 weeks (day and night time) except for shower, bath and therapy.
  • Non-compliance with immobilization can cause failure of the repair.

What Shirt Should I Wear to Surgery?

  • Bring a loose fitting shirt (button-down or over-sized T- shirt).
  • The arm in the sling is tucked under the shirt, the other arm is placed through the sleeve.

Do I Receive Rehabilitation After Surgery?

  • Therapy begins according to a strict therapy schedule usually 2-4 weeks after surgery.
  • Physical therapy progresses over a 16-week period from full immobilization to full return of motion.
  • Expect return to full overhead activities and contact sports at approximately 6 months.
  • Each patient has an individually designed rehab program.

Where Can I Do Therapy?

  • Therapy is performed with a licensed therapist usually at approved outpatient therapy centers.
  • Dr. Hommen will tailor a therapy protocol according to your shoulder needs for therapist to follow.

Shoulder Dislocation/Instability:

Shoulder Dislocation Pamphlet   Shoulder Dislocation Pamphlet

Shoulder Instability Shoulder Instability

What Causes a Shoulder Dislocation?

  • Anterior dislocations: Usually a sudden hyper-external rotational force when the arm is in a vulnerable position.
  • Posterior dislocations: Sudden posteriorly directed force with the arm at the side and internally rotated.

What Happens to the Labrum and Capsule?

  • The labrum and capsules may become detached from the glenoid rim.

What is a Bankart Lesion? A HAGL Lesion? A RAGHL Lesion?

  • Bankart lesion is a detachment of the inferior glenohumeral ligament and labrum from the glenoid bone. Found in over 80% of shoulder dislocations.
  • A HAGL lesion is a Humeral Avulsion of the Glenohumeral Ligament lesion. As opposed to a Bankart lesion, the ligament is detached from the anterior humerusinstead of the glenoid.
  • A RHAGL (or Reverse HAGL) lesion is similar to a HAGL lesion except on the posterior aspect of the humerus.

What Other Injuries May be Found in Shoulder DIslocations?

  • SLAP lesion and labrum tears.
  • Bicep tendon tear.
  • Axillary nerve and other nerve injuries.
  • Rotator cuff tears (more common after age 40).

Can I Also Have a Fracture?

  • Fractures of the glenoid, humeral head, coracoid, and acromion can happen with shoulder dislocations.
  • MRI and/or CT scans might be needed to assess fractures.

What is a Hill Sachs Lesion?

  • A Hill Sachs lesion is a posterior humeral head fracture.
  • Caused by the posterior humerus engaging the glenoid in anterior dislocations.
  • Large Hills Sachs lesions may need to be repaired to prevent further instability.
  • The fracture can also occur on the anterior humeral head in posterior dislocations called a reverse Hill Sachs.

What is the Difference Between a Shoulder Subluxation and a Dislocation?

  • When the shoulder is partially dislocated, it is called a subluxation.
  • When the humeral head completely dissociates from the glenoid, it is called a dislocation.
  • Dislocations might require emergent reduction in the Emergency Room if they do not spontaneously reduce.

How Are Tears Treated Non-Surgically?

  • Brief period of shoulder sling immobilization.
  • New research shows possible benefits of special sling immobilization with shoulder held in external rotation.
  • Shoulder therapy to strengthen the shoulder stabilizers.

What is the Dislocation Recurrence Rate of Shoulders Treated Without Surgery?

AgeRecurrence Rate
1-10100%
11-2027-100%
21-3040-80%
31-4040-80%
41-500-25%

How Are Dislocations Surgically Treated?

  • Open and arthroscopic surgery can be performed to repair the capsule and labrum.
  • Anchors are placed in the glenoid or humerus bone and used to repair the ligament, capsule, and labrum.

What Is Arthroscopic Surgery?

  • A less invasive procedure to repair the tendon tear.
  • A camera is inserted into the shoulder and viewed via a video monitor.
  • The surgeon can repair the tendon.

Which is More Successful: Arthroscopic or Open Repairs?

  • Arthroscopy has a very high success rate (90+%), however, certain instability cases may require an open repair.

What are the Benefits of Arthroscopic Surgery?

  • A less invasive procedure with the benefits:
  • Less surgical dissection.
  • Less surgical pain.
  • Faster recovery rates.
  • Better visualization of the shoulder anatomy.

What Type of Anesthesia Will I Have?

  • Arthroscopies are performed under general anesthesia.
  • A nerve block may be performed for pain relief after surgery.

What Can I Expect the Night Before Surgery?

  • You may take your regularly scheduled medications.
  • Certain medications must be stopped before surgery (such as blood thinners). A complete list will be given to you by our office staff.
  • Do not eat or drink after midnight before your surgery.
  • You will be contacted by the hospital or surgical center the day before surgery.
  • You will be notified: when to arrive for your surgery, when you can eat, and will be helpful in answering questions you may have concerning medication, transportation, and other concerns.

When Do I Go Home After Surgery?

  • The majority of arthroscopic cases are outpatient procedures and patients are allowed to go home the same day of their procedure.
  • In certain cases, patients may stay overnight for observation at the hospital and will be allowed to go home in the morning after surgery.
  • After your surgery, expect to remain in the recovery room until you have been cleared to go home. This may require a few hours.

What Happens If I Have an Anesthesia Nerve Block?

  • Patients who have a nerve block, will have prolonged anesthesia to the shoulder and arm and may go home with the arm still "numb".
  • Therefore, be careful to avoid any pressure or injury to the shoulder and arm as you will not feel the pain until the block has worn off.

Can I Drive Home After Surgery?

  • You should arrange transportation with family, friends or other means for after surgery.
  • You will NOT be able to drive for 4-6 weeks after surgery until you have been cleared.

What Kind of Pain Can I Expect Following Surgery?

  • As with any surgery, there will be surgical pain. The benefit of arthroscopic surgery is the limited amount of surgical dissection and faster recovery time.
  • You will be prescribed narcotic medication to go home with.
  • Do NOT make important decisions while taking narcotic medications.

What Pain Medications Do I Take After Surgery?

  • You will be prescribed a narcotic for pain relief after surgery.
  • You should continue the medication for the first 72 hours as directed and then wean the medications when you are able.
  • Do not attempt to lift the arm "actively" by yourself.
  • Do NOT remove the sling. The repair will take about 6 weeks to heal onto the bone and longer for complete healing. Early activity may cause failure of your repair.
  • Do NOT make important decisions immediately after surgery or while on narcotic medications.

When and How Do I Bathe or Shower After Surgery?

  • Do not bathe or go into a pool until Dr. Hommen has cleared you for such activity.
  • You may shower after 72 hours if the incisions are dry.
  • Remove dressings from shoulder prior to showering.
  • Remove sling and keep arm at side.

When Do I Remove the Dressings?

  • You may remove the shoulder dressings after 72 hours.
  • Please do NOT remove the white sticky "steri-strips".
  • Towel-dry the incision and place a band-aid over the steri- strips after showering.

How Do I Wean Pain Medications After Surgery?

  • Weaning narcotics is best done by alternating Tylenol in place of a regularly scheduled narcotic pill at every other scheduled narcotic dose.
  • Narcotics are eventually discontinued altogether.
  • Narcotics can make you constipated, nauseous, and can affect your ability to make decisions.

Do I Wear a Sling After Surgery?

  • The shoulder M U S T be maintained in a sling time except for showers, baths and therapy and must be worn day and night.
  • Non-compliance with immobilization can cause failure of the repair.

What Shirt Should I Wear to Surgery?

  • Bring a loose fitting shirt. A button-down or over-sized T- shirt works best.
  • The arm in the sling is tucked under the shirt, the other arm is placed through the sleeve.

Do I Receive Rehabilitation After Surgery?

  • Therapy begins according to a strict therapy schedule usually 2-4 weeks after surgery.
  • Physical therapy progresses over a 16-week period from full immobilization to full return of motion.
  • Expect return to full overhead activities and contact sports at approximately 6 months.
  • Each patient has an individually designed rehab program.

Where Can I Do Therapy?

  • Therapy is performed with a licensed therapist usually at approved outpatient therapy centers.
  • Dr. Hommen will tailor a therapy protocol according to your shoulder needs for therapist to follow.

What Questions Should I ask My Surgeon?

  • Is this a pain I can live with, or am I going to harm myself further if I don't get it fixed?
  • Is the procedure necessary, or is it advisable?
  • Are there other alternatives to surgery?
  • How much will it improve me - a little or a lot? Ask for a percentage.
  • Can it wait, what will happen if I do wait?
  • What is the recovery time?
  • How long will I be off work? How long will I be off sports and leisure activities?
  • How much physical therapy will I need afterwards?
  • Are there regional variations in techniques?
  • How often is this procedure done?
  • Why should I choose this surgeon?
  • How many procedures does he/she do per year?
  • What is his/her results? Does he/she know, and how?
  • What are the potential complications? How common are they?


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Dr. Jan Pieter Hommen
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Jan Pieter Hommen, MD Strikers Doral Academy Preparatory School Florida Memorial University Riviera School St Brendan Florida Christian School